Month: March 2018

Ritmo: VR Rhythm Game for Oculus Rift

Here is a new game skeleton of a VR game for Oculus Rift — and possibly Vive in the near future. I just wanted something fun and quick to develop, as a test bed for my new VR interface lib.

The player must hit objects that come into his direction in synch with the playing music. That results in a good physical exercise, really. And that is basically it.

It of course needs more work — rich and colorful environments, more effects, rewards, statistics, leader boards etc — but the bare-bones game works already, as shown in the above video.

More about this later on, thanks.

Solving Ubuntu stuck on Login Screen

After a simple apt-get update & apt-get upgrade, next time I booted Ubuntu 16.04LTS it was stuck on a login loop, not allowing me to enter the system normally. Searching on Google I found out that many people have had the same problem. I then tried almost everything that was suggested (except for some extremely risky ones which would not work anyway), but nothing fixed the problem for me.

In desperation I tried one thing that ended up working well, and I want to share my solution with you. First, at boot time (on that initial Grub boot selection screen), I chose the previous kernel to boot with. It booted normally, and I could now login to the system again. Then I went to and from the list found the latest Kernel available (it was v4.15.10 at this time), then downloaded these files:


Note that those were two linux-headers (all and amd64, as I’m using 64bit Linux), plus the linux-image, all for the same 4.15.10 Kernel version. You may prefer to choose the low-latency Kernel but they’re really meant for some specific use cases of Linux, so I went with the standard generic one.

After getting the three files, I installed all them at once by typing inside their download directory:

sudo dpkg -i *.deb

Then rebooted. I don’t really know what exactly caused the login problem, or if what I did will solve that for everyone, but for me that fixed the login problem and I also ended up with the latest stable Kernel, while keeping my system intact. I don’t recommend blindly following most crazy suggestions you find out there (uninstalling parts of the system or installing more and more random packages). I believe that upgrading the Kernel was straightforward, did not add or remove any packages, and was safe because if it did not work, I could simply select another older Kernel at boot, and try something else again.

Good luck.

Quickly Install Samba on Raspberry (or any Linux, that is)

So, I wanted to quickly put some USB HDD shared on my network using a Raspberry Pi. This is something simple, but I wasted a bit of extra time to get working this time, so I’m posting here just in case I forget again in the future, or someone comes looking for the same quick solution. On the Raspberry:

If you don’t have nano editor installed, install it first (or skip this if you have it already):

sudo apt-get install nano

Now install and immediately after open smb.conf (the Samba configuration file) for editing:

sudo apt-get install samba samba-common-bin
sudo nano /etc/samba/smb.conf

Put the following lines in the end of smb.conf (only things you really *need* to customize are the path in the second part and maybe the workgroup if your network workgroup is not the default Windows WORKGROUP):

  workgroup = WORKGROUP
  wins support = yes
  netbios name = Raspberry
  server string =
  domain master = no
  local master = yes
  preferred master = yes
  os level = 35
  security = user

  comment = Public
  path = /mnt/media01/Public
  public = yes
  writable = yes
  create mask = 0777
  directory mask = 0777

Remember that the path above must be changed to the actual path of the mounted USB HDD.

Save (CTRL+O then ENTER to save, CTRL+X to leave nano) and then restart Samba:

sudo /etc/init.d/samba reload

Now Windows Explorer should see the shared folder on the network. Please note that this is not set for high security. I don’t have strangers accessing my Wifi network, so I’m not too paranoid with that. If you need stronger security than the quickie above, please look elsewhere.